May the sunshine fall on your face and the wind be at your back
Reblogged from practiceonapeach  11,994 notes

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. he sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lampost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender, little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about *design* and *balance* and getting *interesting planes* into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest *acedemical* tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

By Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via nyctaeus)

Reblogged from yeahwriters  33,919 notes

"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’
I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.
Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’

I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.

When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.

When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”

When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.

Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

Reblogged from practiceonapeach  31,648 notes

PSA for everyone writing term research papers right now

dynastylnoire:

carryonteamfreewill:

Mendeley is the greatest program ever

I want to weep with joy every time I use it

Just click a button when you pull up an article and it will automatically save it to your library

And cite it for you

And you can use it on your mobile devices

And it’s free

Just download it and you won’t have so many urges to kill everyone in sight while writing a research paper

image

Thank you so much!

They showed us how to use this for our dissertations in college, it’s pretty useful if you’re using a lot of computer based research.

Reblogged from sparklenaut  408 notes

sparklenaut:

medresearch:

First Blood Test to Diagnose Depression in Adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The test identifies depression by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions.

The blood test also predicts who will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy based on the behavior of some of the markers. This will provide the opportunity for more effective, individualized therapy for people with depression.

Read more »

Funding: The study was supported by grants R21 MH077234 and R01 MH059708 from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health and by grants from the Davee Foundation.

Original research article in Translational Psychiatry

Reblogged from xekstrin  2,147 notes
Could you explain the whole "i don’t really have depression, i’m actually just a lazy piece of shit" = you've got depression, thing? It rang a bell for me and I'd like to know what you meant. Thanks :)
Anonymous

roachpatrol:

one of the most insidious things about depression is it doesn’t ‘feel’ like depression. even when you have it, you know you have it, you’ve been diagnosed—you still find yourself thinking, no, nope, this isn’t it, can’t be. it’s like the mental illness equivalent of that knight in monty python that keeps going ‘it’s a flesh wound! i’m fine, really! this is just a scratch, i’ll be up in a moment!’ even after all his limbs have been hacked off and he’s lying there helpless.

one of the most common narratives around it is that no one realizes they have depression until they start checking off what they consider to be normal aspects of their lives—and personal character flaws— against the checklist for depression symptoms. really key symptoms include:

  1. lack of motivation
  2. constant tiredness, even exhaustion
  3. finding no pleasure or satisfaction in activities they used to like, or that they know should feel good
  4. not seeing the point of doing anything
  5. increased and even unmanageable anxiety and fearfulness

any one of these symptoms drains away your ability to do work, cope with setbacks, overcome difficulties, or stop procrastinating. multiple symptoms create a pretty perfect storm of intertia and anxious self-loathing. you stop doing anything because it’s hard to get going, unpleasant while you’re at it, and afterwards there’s no reward. why bother, right? and when you’re always tired you get conservative of what little energy you can manage, and when you only feel emotions on the ‘empty to miserable’ spectrum you get really aversive to making mistakes. the whole mess very quickly and very insidiously loads every single thing in your life with toxic emotional baggage.   

and then someone says to you— or you say to yourself, ‘stop being lazy’. and that haunts you forever. you don’t have depression! of course not. mental illness is for people who deserve to be let off the hook for their crimes. you have a character flaw, and it’s getting worse by the minute. 

and that is how people who have been diagnosed, who have been medicated, who have been through therapy, can still spend all day hiding in bed and chewing themselves up over their failure to just somehow magically be a good, healthy, useful person, instead of treating themselves to a sick day and saying ‘yup! it’s depression. i need to be kind to myself.’

Reblogged from ceciliasnerdiness  68 notes

How to live with depression

ceciliasnerdiness:

When I say depression, I don’t mean the “yeah, I get a bit sad every once in a while” kind of depression. I mean the kind of depression that you constantly have to fight to even survive. Some people will never understand the difference between the two. You kind of have to be there to understand it.

I know how hard it is to live with depression. I’m 20 now, and I was diagnosed with depression for the first time when I was about 13. So, yeah, I’ve been doing this for a very long time now. I’m still depressed, and I probably always will be, but I’m handling it. That’s why I want to help others with a few tricks I’ve picked up along the way. 

Don’t isolate yourself.
This is especially important if you have a habit of self-harming or suicidal tendencies. The main goal is to survive, and I know how hard that can be when the depression takes over. That’s when you need others. A friend, a family member, a psychiatrist or even a teacher - you just need someone who checks up on you every once in a while. It’s like having a safety net. I know it’s hard to open up to people about things like this, but it can literally save your life.

Food and sleep is important.
Just like with any other disease, it’s important to eat and sleep if you want to get better. Yes, some people can manage to function on one meal a day and four hours of sleep, but we’re not like that. We need the energy to fight off the extra burden we always carry. Sleep 7 hours every night and make sure you get enough nutrition and vitamins every day.

I, just like many others, can get very self-conscious about my body when my depression gets worse. I know how hard it can be to eat in times like that. You simply have to question yourself what’s more important, your health or your looks. Your health is more important, I promise. It doesn’t matter how thin you look if you’re too depressed to get out of bed in the morning and see it for yourself in the mirror. It’s not worth it.

Don’t listen to those who try to make you feel bad for being sick.
I think we’ve all encountered them. The ones who tell you to “cheer up” or “get over yourself” when you tell them about your problems. Just ignore them. Some people will never understand what it’s like to have a mental disorder since they can’t even imagine what that’s like. Depression is an illness and it’s not your fault you’re sick.

Enjoy the little things.
This is easier said than done, but it really helps when the depression is telling you to end it all. Every time something makes you happy, even the smallest thing, savor it. If you have a moment where you’re actually happy you’re not dead, make sure you remember it. Depression has a way of making you focus on the bad things in life, but you can use those positive memories to drive away the bad thoughts. By remembering good moments, you can use them as proof when the depression tries to tell you everything’s meaningless. Life is beautiful if you know where to look. Life is awful too, but that doesn’t make the good parts less beautiful.

Be careful around drugs and alcohol.
People with depression are at much greater risk of becoming alcoholics or addicted to drugs. If your brain realizes that you’re much happier while using some sort of substance, you’re going to start craving it more and more often. It’s not rocket science. Using alcohol to fight off depression is not a solution, and most of the time it only makes things worse. I’m not telling you to stop drinking completely, but I’m telling you to be careful. My recommendation is to avoid drugs and alcohol when you’re feeling bad. A glass of wine on a good day doesn’t make much difference, but a couple of shots of tequila on a bad day can quickly become a really bad habit.

Seek professional help.
(I know that in some countries, it’s not as easy to get professional help as it is here in Sweden. This advice is mainly for people with access to free health care.)

The most important part of professional psychiatric help is the therapy. Antidepressants can make you feel better, but it can’t take away your actual problems. It’s important to remember that every therapist is unique, just like your problems. That’s why you might have to go through a couple of shrinks before you find one who can actually be of help. For me, it took 7 years before I found a therapist that actually worked for me, but for most people it goes a lot faster. Don’t give up just because your first, second or even third therapist didn’t work for you. You will find someone who gets you if you keep on trying.

Some people need medication to function. I’m one of them. Today’s antidepressants doesn’t make you numb or take away your emotions. Sure, some meds make you constipated, change your blood pressure and do all sorts of weird stuff, but it’s not rat poison.Sometimes therapy doesn’t work because your chemistry is just too messed up, and antidepressants can help you with that. I think one of the main reasons why therapy never worked for me before was because I was too sick to fully take part in it. I needed medicine so I could get well enough to help myself get better.

This leads me to my final, most important advice: Take responsibility of your own well-being. This one’s a hard one. The thing is, you’ll never get better if you don’t do the work yourself. You can get others, like friends, family or psychiatrists, to help you on the way, but you always have to do the worst parts alone. No one can fight your inner demons for you, but they can give you the tools to fight them yourself. It’s a slow process, and it sometimes feels like it’s impossible, but I promise you it’s not.

Believe in yourself. If you kill yourself, the depression wins. Every breath you take is another victory. I believe in you. Good luck.

http://finalfantasyandnerdiness.tumblr.com/post/97813417897